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Christopher Roth
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Christopher got a new hair-cut. It’s long on top and short on the sides and makes him look like the singer for a mildly successful pop band from the 80s—stop, sorry, I can’t continue to talk about Bobby if I call him Christopher. He’s Bobby, he always was, no matter what his parents or his passport say. He’s Bobby in his thinking, which means he’s curious and smart in a strictly unacademic fashion. He’s Bobby in his work, which means he’s bouncing all over the place, writing, making films, art, journalism, selling stuff and being—at times to his detriment—constantly ahead of his time. He’s Bobby in his ways, which means he can be charming one moment and a tyrannt the next. He’s Bobby in his private life, which I’m not going to tell you about. For one, because I don’t really know much about it, even if we are friends. Maybe that’s actually one of the things that attracted us to each other: A secrecy we could consider like politeness mixed with freedom and self-defense. We started off playing tennis, this is a well-known fact. We traveled the world and met people like the writer Don DeLillo and the artist Enki Bilal, the chess legend Victor Kortschnoi and the quantum physicist Thomas Hertog, the filmmaker Paul Schrader and  the philosopher Slavoj Zizek, and published ten books together, all under the banner of 80*81, researching the all too evident and all too overlooked historical shifts that happened in the years 1980 and 1981. We went to India and came back different. We traveled to the future to find our present just as we had traveled to the past to find our present. We produced an opera from that experience, which we showed in Munich at the Staatsoper—eight hours of Yoga, Human League and Algorithm. We organized a series of congresses in Berlin, Johannesburg, and Delhi. Really, what else? We still have plans. And we have #60.

Gilbert and Tonic

Christopher Roth about art and alcohol
21.10.13
1 min
Post

In 1971, Gilbert and George were asked why they had picked Gordon’s for their piece ‘Gordon’s makes us very drunk’ and their answer was: “Because it is the best gin.” For the film, they added their names to the bottle’s label on either side of the Royal crest. Soundtrack was by Elgar and Grieg. At the time there was no alternative to the Schweppes tonic. Nowadays all bars tend to ignore Gordon’s. You have to go to the airport or to the train station to drink it. Only Gordon’s with Schweppes gives me that light feeling of celebration and revolution in the afternoon. And the smell of African juniper the next morning. All people who ordered G&T the first night I met them, became friends. Do you really want to talk about beer or––even worse––talk about wine? Good Lord.

Telluride, Colorado 7:51am, Mountain Time

02.09.13
3 min
Post

Actually I have to go. It is the last day of the film festival. 8:30, I have a breakfast meeting in the Sheradon on Colorado Ave. The internet here in the Ice House is very slow. Later there is a picnic in Town Park. Tomorrow at 6:00am a bus will get us to Montrose airport, where the charter will get us to New York. In the charter I will have time to write about the 40th Telluride Film Festival in the mountains of Colorado. Her are some images, if they upload:

This is the new Werner Herzog Cinema for 650 people. The rest of the year the Werner Herzog is an ice skating venue:

One more thing. This is a fruit I have never seen before. A cross between apricot and plum, the Dapple Dandy Pluot:

It’s sunny every morning and there is rain and thunderstorm every afternoon, so I bought this hat in the angler store: (not to put on outside the US)

Now it is 12:14 Mountain Time and I found out it is Labor Day. I just went to a Q&A for the Cannes winner “Blue Is the Warmest Color”, also known as the lesbian porn, or “La Vie d’Adèle – Chapitres 1 & 2” –– directed by Abdellatif Kechiche,  with Léa Seydoux, Adèle Exarchopoulos, Salim Kechiouche, and Jérémie Laheurte. The film is really good. And really long. Everybody complaines about the sex scenes. But the sex scenes are very good. Sex and art are hard to show in movies. Léa Seydoux plays an artist in the film and her art is really horrible. But the rest is very good. Why are there no mobile phones in the film?

Here they are with my friend Colin MacCabe translating the French (Léa Seydoux in a RUN DMC t-shirt):

and here is the poster:

It’s 5:10pm Mountain Time. I just had lunch with Salman Rushdie. Colin is a very old friend of his. Salman told this nice strory about Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast. First of all it is “movable” not “moveable”, a mistake they took from Hemmingway’s notes because the book was published after his death. It’s full of Hemingway’s personal accounts, observations and stories of the 1920s in Paris.  “If you are lucky enough to have lived in Paris as a young man, then wherever you go for the rest of your life, it stays with you, for Paris is a moveable feast.”

More tomorrow:

Gilbert and Tonic

Christopher Roth about art and alcohol
21.10.13
1 min

Telluride, Colorado 7:51am, Mountain Time

02.09.13
3 min